Memory Monday slides redux, Week 45

Spill Spoiler II

This week I’m wrapping up slide carousel #5, so I have only four vintage slides to share. I can’t say precisely when these photos were shot, but I believe it must have been the Summer of 1978. The place was San Francisco, specifically the Hyde Street Pier — although at that time there were not nearly as many historic ships on display as there are today. I originally shared these images in mid March 2017; if you look back to that post, you’ll see a couple of views of the 1914 paddlewheel steamer Eppleton Hall that I shot in 2016. It’s clear that particular boat has undergone a few changes over the years!

Eppleton Hall, a steam sidewheeler with side-lever engines, is the only remaining intact example of a Tyne paddle tug. A direct descendent of the first craft to go into commercial service as harbor tugs, the vessel was engaged on the Wear and Tyne rivers of northeast England from 1914-1967. In 1946, she was purchased by France Fenwick, Wear and Tyne Ltd., which operated her in the Wear River until 1964 (she is being restored to this period today) — National Park Service

Eppleton Hall, 1978; her two paddlewheels are hidden by the white structures on either side of the forward hull

Eppleton Hall, 2016

Sadly, we didn’t get to ride in the helicopter

Standing at the quarterdeck rail of Balclutha with Mom

Balclutha, 2016; the spot where we stood is near the top of the ladder

2016; the view from the same spot on the quarterdeck

Next week, I hope to move on to slide carousel #2, which includes a small collection of .family pictures from the 1980s.

1 Comment »

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.