Mexico Monday Redux, Week 20

During our summer trips to Mexico, we did a lot of traveling along small roads; many areas of the country back then had no major modern highways. Of course, that’s still true in parts of the country today. But back in 1970 it seemed that even the toll roads were narrow and had no median barriers. The “big” roads between […]

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Aquamarine

It was an extremely windy spot on the Sonoma coast in Salt Point State Park, just north of Gerstle Cove, and I had the place mostly to myself as I clambered over the rocks trying to get a peek into some tide pools. I chose not to climb down too close to where the tide washed in, so my tide […]

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Observing Juneteenth

Today, I wanted to find a way to observe the newest US federal holiday — but somehow shouting “Happy Juneteenth!” just doesn’t feel appropriate. Instead, I took the long overdue action of educating myself about the history of this historic day. I have to admit I was a little confused about its origin and meaning. I assumed it commemorated the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation — but a bit of research online showed me how wrong I was! Certainly part of the blame for this gap in my knowledge lies with my high school history curriculum, which completely passed over this “minor” detail in covering the American Civil War and Reconstruction. But of course, I’ve been out of high school a very long time. So, for anyone else who hasn’t been paying attention until this year, here’s what I now understand: The Emancipation Proclamation, freeing all slaves held in the confederate states, took effect on January 1, 1863. But it wasn’t until Congress passed the 13th Amendment in April 1864 that emancipation was made national policy. This amendment was signed by Lincoln in February 1865 and ratified in December of that same year. Not surprisingly, even after the Emancipation Proclamation went into effect it wasn’t immediately implemented throughout the American South. Union soldiers spread the news of the new law as they moved deeper into Confederate territory. It wasn’t until two years after it took effect, in mid June 1865, […]

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Rock hopping

Climbing over and around the rocks near Gerstle Cove (in Salt Point State Park), I may not have been able to access the tide pools, but I still found a lot of interesting sights and enough beauty all around to keep me busy with my camera. This state park is named Salt Point for a reason! Below is just an […]

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April trails

Today, with the temperature reaching up into the 100+ degree range, I’m staying indoors and looking back to only two months ago, when we visited Rattlesnake Bar one morning and I explored a portion of the Pioneer Express Trail I had never seen before.

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