Catching the Peloton, or, Who Are Those Guys??

The following entry was originally posted on 27 February, 2008 on my old blog: Last week we went over to Sebastopol and watched Stage I of the Tour of California. We’ve been there every year for the last three years, and this was the second year we climbed halfway up Coleman Valley Road and watched the peloton snake its way up toward us. I’ve got some GREAT video, but my stills aren’t the best. Oh well — every year I learn something new about photographing the race; maybe someday I’ll get something good enough to share. Either way, I’m happy because I got to see the guys in person and I’ve got pictures to prove it. Work started up again this week, and I’ve got to say I’m glad, although it may be tough getting back into the routine again. Oh, wait — I forgot. I never really HAD a routine, which was part of my problem. Seriously, one of these days I’ve got to make up a work schedule and make myself stick to it. You know, so I’ll be able to work and still have a life . . . I finished up my “quickie” knitting project — took time off from the Pinwheel Sweater to knit up a hat, with the intention of giving it to my mom. Last summer I bought two skeins of Cascade 220 in a lavender shade which I thought she might really […]

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Save some money at the pump

I just read a piece in my local newspaper with some interesting info. The article is supposed to be posted in a special section of this site: http://www.orangevalejournal.com — although at last check I couldn’t actually find the article on the site. I’ll quote the salient portions of the article: “These tips come from the Kinder Morgan Pipeline where [the source] works in San Jose, CA. They deliver about 4 million gallons through the pipeline in an average 24-hour period. One day they are pumping diesel; the next day is jet fuel, and gasoline, regular and premium grades. They have 34 storage tanks here in San Jose with a total capacity of 16,800,000 gallons. And here are some of his tips. 1) Only buy or fill up your car or truck in the early morning when the ground temperature is coolest. Remember that all service stations have their storage tanks buried below ground. The colder the ground, the more dense the gasoline. When it gets warmer, gasoline expands, so buying in the afternoon or in the evening, your gallon is not exactly a gallon . . . A 1-degree rise in temperature is a big deal for this business. But service stations do not have temperature compensation at the pumps. 2) When you’re filling up, do not squeeze the trigger of the nozzle to the fastest mode. if you look, you will see that the trigger has three stages: low, […]

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